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Mary Ann Wallace 


Encyclopedia IndexIn our last issue, we asked authors who submitted articles to Tom Fahey's Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine and Science to update their articles before publication, since many had been written several years ago.  We provided instructions and an authortemplate to streamline the process.  Anthony Hackney, the first author to follow the revised policy, provides a clinical discussion of how endurance training affects testosterone in Testosterone and Reproductive Dysfunction in Endurance-Trained Men.

Sportscience NewsAndy Stewart and Hideki Takagi report on the VIII International Symposium of Biomechanics and Medicine in Swimming, held in Jyvaskyla, Finland. Making a Splash highlights research on drafting, underwater pace-maker lights, reducing drag, and adds to the intensity vs volume debate.

Ferret uncovers coaching challenges with a statistical analysis of a team's basketball season, research taking place during the Hawaii Ironman,  the skills necessary for successful baseball players, and  health concerns over supplementing with androstenedione.  Share your interest in a news item with others:  send a paragraph or two to ferret=AT=sportsci.org.

In Frank Katch's latest History Maker you can read how Russel Henry Chittenden pursued his curiosity about the taste of leftover scallops. His scientific curiosity led to research refocusing attention on minimum protein requirement.   Chittendenís experiments showed that normal and athletic young men did not experience weakness on low protein diet, and that even without a large protein intake, individuals could maintain their health and fitness.

Ken Daley's newsletter has an item on efforts to introduce online peer review for scholarly works in electronic journals.  Links to faculty worldwide who are using the Web to deliver class materials, a sport website featuring physically disabled athletes, and many other items are in his column.

Research Resources IndexStats programs often give only p values when you analyze your data, yet confidence intervals are much better for generalizing from your sample to a population.  In A New View of Statistics, Will Hopkins provides an amazingly simple but effective way to convert a p value into confidence limits.   It works for any difference between means (the analyses we do most of the time), and for any other normally distributed statistic.  He's put it into a spreadsheet, along with methods to generate confidence limits for correlations, standard deviations, and measures of reliability.

Sportscience Team IndexA special welcome to Tony Hackney at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who joins us as a member of the Sportscience Team.  Tony's already been active as one of the first Encylopedia authors to update and publish an article under our revised encylopedia policy.  Thanks, Tony, for jumping on board and raising the sail.


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